MadCast: doublestufforeo

Celebrating Pride

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4 hours ago, MadCast: Usefully Useless said:

but as the targeted demographic (Straight, white male) I don't feel like I should have any more or less of a right or an option to do something as well. As long as it's not a satirical, tongue-in-cheek type of scenario

It's not so much that you don't have the option to. It's that last bit "as long as it's not a satirical, tongue-in-cheek type of scenario", that's the kicker. The people who are planning straight white parades are doing them to literally just have mobile Trump rallies right now. 

Coming back to it, in a "perfect world" scenario, we would rather not be hosting these celebrations of our community, because these things should just be a natural flow in society. But because of the past, we don't use it as this "exclusive" holiday. It's in commemoration of Stonewall, and in regards to the years of bullshit the community has put up with. 

4 hours ago, MadCast: Usefully Useless said:

I say that to say this : I am tired of feeling guilty for being happy about being me for what I am.

This is wrong. I don't mean you, I mean in general. I hate that people think that because I am celebrating myself and my community, it means that you can't have an opinion, voice it, or be who you are. That's literally what we've been fighting for, and I don't want you to feel any remorse or guilt for things others have done. On the flip side though, it's nice to see the shoe on the other proverbial foot here. More so in reference to those who do hinder progress, I hope those people feel what we have felt for years; if only for a moment.

4 hours ago, MadCast: Usefully Useless said:

I think the only "norm" standard we need to have is how we treat other human beings.

This just comes back to the perfect world scenario, but unfortunately there's always going to be the high school lunch room mentality where you have your groups and cliques. I hate to reference a cartoon in such a serious conversation, but honestly Rick and Morty did it perfectly: 

Image result for nipple race war

People will always find something to hate. 

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But I am excellent Baal.  The culture I was brought up in reinforces my moral lifestyle.  That lifestyle is threatened by a growing tide of aberrant behavior that threatens how I think the world should be sorted.

This retreat into general platitudes, or the nebulous shifting of the discussion away from the purpose of Pride to "why can't we all just get along" is obfuscation at best, silencing at worst.  Straight people don't face any increased risk of violence for being straight.  You aren't going to lose a job for being straight.  You won't be denied a housing application because you are straight.  Straight Pride is another extension of reactionary politics that seeks to take away the impact of Pride.







 

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The fact that I'm even talking about Borderlands in a Pride thread just makes me giddy. The game has hinted before in side quests that characters were part of the queer community, but in Borderlands 3 they just put it in your fucking face. It makes me so happy to see queer representation displayed so naturally in a video game.

They make it so simple, the gesture of holding hands in troubled times, or just speaking of the other in a caring manner. (There's even a little easter egg in the art at the end that I won't spoil for anyone.) 

Just thinking about young impressionable me, and if I had more exposure to just how normal being queer is, it would've made things a little bit easier for me growing up. I'm just so happy that's where we are as a society. It sounds sappy, but I legitimately just cried some happy tears last night when I completed the game and saw the character development for them. It was so simple, but such a perfect touch, and it makes me incredibly proud of Gearbox for including it in their game.

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For my own selfish, craven wants, I like increased representation in both in-fiction characters and RL creators because it makes for good stories.  It won't last forever, but I think if you are savvy you can consume so much fascinating media from a plethora of creators of all races, orientations, levels of education, etc.  It'll change in time, but it's so easy to access stuff from a variety of content creators right now and it's a shame it's not even more prolific.




 

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Oh man, I'm so glad to see a thread like this. Kudos to you doublestufforeo. I saw the first posts on the front page when I first joined, and told Craiden in my initial interview that I was glad to see this site was more open minded (and, for lack of a better word 'liberal') than the last forum I used to visit. It was a forum I read/visited for almost 20 years, all starting from playing Everquest in 99. Unfortunately, over the last few years, the site has become a pretty heavy alt-right site, and I just couldn't take it anymore. I was so tired of the hate on gays, trans, 'the left', sjws, etc.. and being drowned out by the echo chamber of hate if I tried to voice any dissenting opinion. 

While i'm straight myself, I've come to the realization that if I found out a woman I was dating was born post-op trans woman, I don't think I'd have a problem with that. Some more traditionally minded men would likely balk at that idea, claiming it makes me 'gay', but whatever.
I've also always had a fair amount of gay and/or trans friends and I've always been kind of intrigued by gay and trans culture. There's quite a few 'gay' things that I've been into or enjoy, such as music. I only mention these things to give you an idea of where I'm coming from in regards to the topic. 
 

On 7/2/2019 at 7:35 PM, MadCast: Kitty Stark said:

If I might chip in here, I agree to an extent with this. I strongly believe that, for the most part, gender is a social construct that is simply used to try and keep people in tidy boxes. I don't see any need for clothes to be divided into men and women, or for the colors pink and blue to be used for nearly everything related to baby showers and newborns. I don't care for the belief that boys shouldn't cry, or that female emotions are always over-complicated.

However, I also tend to think that most people who identify as trans may simply be confused or influenced by these very social constructs.

I had to quote this, as it does reflect something I believe to be true. On one hand, there's people trying to break down the social construct of gender (i.e. pink is female, blue is male) but many trans people, especially among trans women, are infatuated with those same social constructs. They are fascinated by society's definition of 'female' or 'girly'. In a perfect world, where your biological sex didn't dictate which of those constructs we expected you to fall into, I think we'd see a lot less true 'trans' and simply more 'girly dudes'.  Not that its very relevant to today's world, as that is a hypothetical fantasy world, but its an interesting philosophical question, none the less. 
I saw that this became a big discussion before, so I want to elaborate further to (hopefully) avoid any confusion. I am NOT saying trans people are 'confused' about actually being trans. What I am saying, is that I think their body dysmorphia and such, stems from the fact that their body doesn't align with what society says it should be for them to act the way they naturally feel. I.e. for a trans woman, if their body was naturally female, then it would be fine for them to be into those things. But, because our society looks down on boys playing with makeup, clothes, high heels, etc.. as that is not a 'manly' thing to do, it magnifies those negative feelings. If there were no preconceived notions of what a man or woman should 'be', then I think some portion of them wouldn't feel so strongly about changing their actual body with surgery. Again, not ALL of them, I'm sure there would still be many who simply hate their body and may not even be into 'girly' things at all. I've just seen or met a large number of trans women who are into hyper-feminine things and aesthetics. The whole drag queen culture is also based on these ideas, for example. 

As for the straight pride parade comments, I pretty much agree with everything you've said, doublestufforeo. Anyone who questions why 'we' (being a cis white hetero male myself) can't have 'white history month' or 'straight pride parades' is being ignorant of the fact that every OTHER day/month are basically those things. I'm half irish, so I might celebrate 'Irish pride', and that would be fine. No one would call me racist for celebrating my Irish heritage. Unfortunately, most black people had their ancestry stolen from them when their ancestors became slaves. They often have no real idea which country their families called home in the past, so 'Black pride' is a way for all of them to celebrate their history. 'Black pride' is the most accurate way they could describe their heritage and it doesn't have hatred behind the idea. 'White pride' is simply based on exclusionary tendencies, though. Similar thing with gay pride, its based on a mutual struggle that is shared among gay people, in an effort to combat marginalization. Straight people aren't marginalized, so there is no reason to celebrate it other then in an effort to mock gay people for doing so. 
 

Edited by Enzee
missed a word

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That was pretty good. I'm impressed with the choreography and cinematography, as they did that in a single moving shot.  Seems like the kind of song that would be a banger in a club, but think id get tired of it on its own. 

Do you know this one, dso? Tik tok made it blow up a little (they love to use the chorus). It's a trans woman that makes it/sings it, and she has some great pop song writing abilities. 

  

Edited by Enzee

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I love social experiments like this one: 

 

It poses some really interesting questions on stereotypes and makes you think. It challenges a lot of stigmas and forces you to face them head on.

Edited by MadCast: doublestufforeo

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I had it down to two guys (jonathan and evan) but not because of any stereotypes. The main clue was the interviews (the mole didn't have one, cause whoever made it didn't think that part through to have him still lie in a post-interview).  But, in case they did and that wasn't proof, I thought those two both deflected questions a bit, or just had good vague responses to some stuff. 

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It's October, which means that in 9 days we will be celebrating the 31st year running of National Coming Out Day here in the United States. A little history for you: 

"On Oct. 11, 1987, half a million people participated in the March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. It was the second such demonstration in our nation’s capital and resulted in the founding of a number of LGBTQ organizations, including the National Latino/a Gay & Lesbian Organization (LLEGÓ) and AT&T’s LGBTQ employee group, LEAGUE.  The momentum continued four months after this extraordinary march as more than 100 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer activists from around the country gathered in Warrenton, Va., about 25 miles outside Washington, D.C. Recognizing that the LGBTQ community often reacted defensively to anti-LGBTQ actions, they came up with the idea of a national day to celebrate coming out and chose the anniversary of that second march on Washington to mark it. The originators of the idea were Rob Eichberg, a founder of the personal growth workshop, The Experience, and Jean O'Leary, then head of National Gay Rights Advocates. From this idea the National Coming Out Day was born.

Each year on Oct. 11, National Coming Out Day continues to promote a safe world for LGBTQ individuals to live truthfully and openly." - The Human Rights Campaign, 2018

Coming out and living openly aren’t something you do once, or even for one year. It’s a journey that we make every single day of our lives. Every coming out experience is unique and must be navigated in the way most comfortable for the individual. Whether it's for the first time ever or the first time today, coming out can be an arduous journey. It is also a brave decision to live openly and authentically.

To quote Sir Ian McKellen, "I’ve never met a gay person who regretted coming out – including myself. Life at last begins to make sense, when you are open and honest."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

A resource guide to coming out:

Throughout the process of coming out and living ever more openly, you should always be in the driver’s seat about how, where, when and with whom you choose to be open. If you're wondering how to come out, this guide was designed to help you through that process in realistic and practical terms. It acknowledges that the experience of coming out and living openly covers the full spectrum of human emotion – from fear to euphoria. Whether coming out to friends, family, coworkers or healthcare providers, your approach and timing will be as unique as your own sense of identity.

The guide covers a wide array of topics, such as coming out as your true identity, family and community (even going as far as specifying cultural differences within different guides,) religion and faith, within the workplace, and in a healthcare setting. 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

On a very serious note, do not ever out someone. It is not something that you get to do, regardless of any religious background, or moral standings you may have. If someone isn't ready for that sort of stress, there can be terrible consequences. Even if that someone has already confided in you about their sexual orientation, it by no means gives you any right to further stating it to others. 

 

 

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With it being November, and politics in full swing, I think it's appropriate to discuss queer representation in politics:

 

"Harvey Milk, was a visionary civil and human rights leader who became one of the first openly gay elected officials in the United States when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. Milk’s unprecedented loud and unapologetic proclamation of his authenticity as an openly gay candidate for public office, and his subsequent election gave never before experienced hope  to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered (LGBT) people everywhere at a time when the community was encountering widespread hostility and discrimination. His remarkable career was tragically cut short when he was assassinated nearly a year after taking office." - Milk Foundation

 

On Nov. 27, 1978, Supervisor Milk and Mayor George Moscone were assassinated by Dan White, a former police officer and former city supervisor who had clashed with Milk over LGBTQ issues. After shooting the mayor, White entered Milk's office and shot him five times at his desk.

Despite his short career in politics, Milk became an icon in San Francisco and a martyr in the gay community. In 2002, Milk was called "the most famous and most significantly open LGBT official ever elected in the United States".

In last year's midterm elections, Colorado elected the nation's first openly gay governor. Voters across the country sent a record number of LGBT candidates to Congress. These victories come 40 years after the assassination of the first openly gay elected official in California — Harvey Milk.

Milk's murder transformed national politics.

The success of LGBTQ candidates in the midterm elections would have been hard to imagine four decades ago when Milk first won office. In California at that time, a conservative state senator named John Briggs was pushing a statewide ballot measure, Proposition 6, to ban gay and lesbian teachers. Harvey Milk led the fight against the proposition, debating Briggs around the state.

 

As of 2019:

  • all 50 states have been served by openly LGBT elected politicians in some capacity;
  • 46 states have elected openly LGBT politicians to one or both houses of their state legislature;
  • there has been one openly bisexual state governor (Kate Brown);
  • one state governor (Jim McGreevey) has come out as gay just before resigning from office, and one openly gay person (Jared Polis) was elected governor after coming out as gay.
  • no openly LGBT person has served as president or vice president of the United States, nor has an openly gay person ever served on the Supreme Court of the United States or served as a Cabinet Secretary. However, there is speculation that President James Buchanan may have been gay or bisexual. Likewise, there is speculation that President Abraham Lincoln may have been gay or bisexual. See Wikipedia page: Sexuality of Abraham Lincoln

 

We still have a ways to go, but over the last four decades since Milk's murder we have come so far. I look forward to seeing the progress we make moving forward.

 

Also if you'd like there's a movie about Harvey Milk.

 

 

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Something that I didn't bring to light either for those of you who are interested in the arts. Little Shop of Horrors has the first transgender female lead. You can watch their performance of Suddenly Seymour posted below. 

Little Shop of Horrors always starts with a seed. It just happens that, this time, it has nothing to do with a plant.

 

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World AIDS day was December 1st and I implore you to find out more about the World Aids Foundation here

 

From earlier in this thread: 

The false spreading of information on HIV/AIDS, and the fear mongering that the media pressed onto our community completely stripped our culture, and identity. 

"At the beginning of HIV epidemic, in many countries gay men and other men who have sex with men were frequently singled out for abuse as they were seen to be responsible for the transmission of HIV. Sensational reporting in the press, which became increasingly homophobic, fueled this view. Headlines such as “Alert over ‘gay plague’”, and “‘Gay plague’ may lead to blood ban on homosexuals” demonized the LGBT community." - Avert, 2018

It's a stigma that lives on to this day. It's something I hear consistent jokes about, it's also something that I highly recommend you refrain from using in your day to day. It's become tacky and tasteless. Using it as a mockery is outdated, immature, and impedes the progress that we've made as a society in the prevention, and eradication of HIV. 

"PrEP. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high risk for HIV take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily. Among people who inject drugs, PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV by at least 74% when taken daily." - The Center for Disease Control, August 6th, 2019

I want to emphasize that quote is from exactly two weeks ago from this posting. It's outstanding what modern medicine can do. PrEP is something that (especially within the queer community,) has become as common place as taking a daily vitamin. You see dating profiles with "HIV- on PrEP" or some other form of disclosure on their HIV status.

Getting tested and knowing your status, as well as open communication with potential partners is the major battle for prevention, and eradication of this disease. You can regularly find community outreach centers for LGBT+ that will test you for free for HIV and other venereal diseases.

"In a real-world study, many of those newly diagnosed with HIV had a chance to work with a healthcare provider to prevent HIV prior to their diagnoses. Nearly 2 out of 3 patients newly diagnosed with HIV had visited a healthcare facility at least once prior to diagnosis." - Truvada HCP, 2019

"Only 23% and 47% of sexually active men and women, respectively, report receiving a sexual risk assessment, despite visiting a healthcare provider in the past year." - Truvada HCP, 2019

Young adults continue to be the group at highest risk, (ages 20-29) which makes it so important for us to have this discussion. To fight the disease is to fight the old ways of looking at it. This conversation is something that's so commonplace within the queer community nowadays, and it's something I'm immensely proud of our community for. The information is so readily available to you, it's just a matter of seeking it out and learning more for yourself. 

Break the barrier, and start educating yourselves. Learn where you can get tested.

Learn more about PrEP as prevention.

As per always if you have any questions you want answered, you can ask them in this thread, or DM me on the forums or Discord. I'm be happy to answer them (to the best of my ability,) privately, or publicly (anonymously,) if you so choose.

 

Spread information, not HIV.

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On 12/7/2019 at 4:28 PM, MadCast: doublestufforeo said:

World AIDS day was December 1st and I implore you to find out more about the World Aids Foundation here

 

From earlier in this thread: 

The false spreading of information on HIV/AIDS, and the fear mongering that the media pressed onto our community completely stripped our culture, and identity. 

"At the beginning of HIV epidemic, in many countries gay men and other men who have sex with men were frequently singled out for abuse as they were seen to be responsible for the transmission of HIV. Sensational reporting in the press, which became increasingly homophobic, fueled this view. Headlines such as “Alert over ‘gay plague’”, and “‘Gay plague’ may lead to blood ban on homosexuals” demonized the LGBT community." - Avert, 2018

It's a stigma that lives on to this day. It's something I hear consistent jokes about, it's also something that I highly recommend you refrain from using in your day to day. It's become tacky and tasteless. Using it as a mockery is outdated, immature, and impedes the progress that we've made as a society in the prevention, and eradication of HIV. 

"PrEP. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at very high risk for HIV take daily medicine to prevent HIV. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily. Among people who inject drugs, PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV by at least 74% when taken daily." - The Center for Disease Control, August 6th, 2019

I want to emphasize that quote is from exactly two weeks ago from this posting. It's outstanding what modern medicine can do. PrEP is something that (especially within the queer community,) has become as common place as taking a daily vitamin. You see dating profiles with "HIV- on PrEP" or some other form of disclosure on their HIV status.

Getting tested and knowing your status, as well as open communication with potential partners is the major battle for prevention, and eradication of this disease. You can regularly find community outreach centers for LGBT+ that will test you for free for HIV and other venereal diseases.

"In a real-world study, many of those newly diagnosed with HIV had a chance to work with a healthcare provider to prevent HIV prior to their diagnoses. Nearly 2 out of 3 patients newly diagnosed with HIV had visited a healthcare facility at least once prior to diagnosis." - Truvada HCP, 2019

"Only 23% and 47% of sexually active men and women, respectively, report receiving a sexual risk assessment, despite visiting a healthcare provider in the past year." - Truvada HCP, 2019

Young adults continue to be the group at highest risk, (ages 20-29) which makes it so important for us to have this discussion. To fight the disease is to fight the old ways of looking at it. This conversation is something that's so commonplace within the queer community nowadays, and it's something I'm immensely proud of our community for. The information is so readily available to you, it's just a matter of seeking it out and learning more for yourself. 

Break the barrier, and start educating yourselves. Learn where you can get tested.

Learn more about PrEP as prevention.

As per always if you have any questions you want answered, you can ask them in this thread, or DM me on the forums or Discord. I'm be happy to answer them (to the best of my ability,) privately, or publicly (anonymously,) if you so choose.

 

Spread information, not HIV.

Yep, we had a lot of PEP information in the UN and training on what to ask and what not to ask which was pretty clear and rational as it related to other sensitive subjects such as conversion or coming out.

I guess this is why I've heard a lot about AIDS awareness in the radio when landing in Philly on Friday, discussions and whatnot

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