BonelessSkeleton

Books? Books!

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We do have this thread already, for reference!

 

I wish I took the time to read as much as I used to, but some books that I loved reading when I was younger were the Pendragon series and anything by Cornelia Funke. I'm a sucker for thoroughly-described fantasy worlds.

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At the moment, I am reading Das Kapital, Moscow 2042, Caoir Gheal Leumraich (a collection of poetry by Somhairle MacGill-Eain), and Rousseau and Revolution by Will and Ariel Durant. 

As to favourite books? that is a list to long to go into here. 

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9 hours ago, MadCast: Kitty Stark said:

I'm a sucker for thoroughly-described fantasy worlds.

Dearest Kitty, I very much want to introduce you to the absolutely enchanting books of Victoria Schwab. From the heroes and anti-heroes of Vicious, to the mundane and magical versions of London in her Shades of Magic trilogy, to a city full of dark secrets and dangerous monsters in her Monsters of Verity duology.

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im currently reading the manga series fushigi yuugi (also have fushigi yuugi:genbu kaiden) by yuu watase , bought the omnibus version and have the whole series, was one of the first mangas i ever read as a kid in my local library and never finished it, so now i am finishing it! there is also an anime dont know if there is one for genbu kaiden but i know the original has a pretty decent anime! its old but sooo good :) 

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I like Fantasy Fiction the most, and have read most of the big series. I also really like the classics.

Favorite Fantasy Fiction / Sci-Fi Series:

  1. Malazan (Ian C. Esslemont and Steven Erikson...all of it)
  2. The Dark Tower (Stephen King)
  3. Necronomicon (H.P. Lovecraft)
  4. The Hyborian Age Collection (Robert E. Howard)
  5. Hyperion series (Dan Simmons)
  6. Foundation (Isaac Asimov)
  7. Dune Series (Frank Herbert...I don't really like the stuff by his son, but it's a style thing)
  8. The Expanse (James S.A. Corey)
  9. Dresden Files (Jim Butcher)
  10. The Stand (Stephen King)
  11. The First Law and accompanying series (Joe Abercrombie)

Other Favorites:

  1. Allan Quartermain (H. Rider Haggard)
  2. Basic Economics: A Citizen's Guide to the Economy (Thomas Sowell)
  3. War as I Knew it (General George S. Patton)
  4. The Art of War (Sun Tzu)
  5. The Catcher in the Rye ( J.D. Salinger)
  6. Dracula (Bram Stoker)
  7. The Picture of Dorian Gray (Oscar Wilde)
  8. To Kill A Mockingbird (Harper Lee)
  9. On War (Carl Von Clausewitz)
  10. Catch-22 (Joseph Heller)

Currently Reading:

Broken Empire series by Mark Lawrence.

Books in the sereis:

  1. Prince of Thorns
  2. King of Thorns
  3. Emperor of Thorns
  4. Prince of Fools
  5. The Liar's Key
  6. The Wheel of Osheim
  7. Various Novellas and Short Stories

 

 

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I am not reading anything at the moment, although I do have a lot of books to reread and series to finish. My favorite series are the Chronicles of Narnia, anything by Rick Riordan, anything by Clive Cussler (especially the Fargo Adventures!), the Wings of Fire series and sequel series, and the Fox and O'Hare series! For books on their own, there's a really good one called the Dragon Rider!

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On 5/5/2020 at 10:11 AM, MadCast: Mandalorian said:

I like Fantasy Fiction the most, and have read most of the big series. I also really like the classics.

Favorite Fantasy Fiction / Sci-Fi Series:

  1. Malazan (Ian C. Esslemont and Steven Erikson...all of it)
  2. The Dark Tower (Stephen King)
  3. Necronomicon (H.P. Lovecraft)
  4. The Hyborian Age Collection (Robert E. Howard)
  5. Hyperion series (Dan Simmons)
  6. Foundation (Isaac Asimov)
  7. Dune Series (Frank Herbert...I don't really like the stuff by his son, but it's a style thing)
  8. The Expanse (James S.A. Corey)
  9. Dresden Files (Jim Butcher)
  10. The Stand (Stephen King)
  11. The First Law and accompanying series (Joe Abercrombie)

 

 

 

Just sticking with your main list, since those are more my cup of tea =P  

I've started 1, 2 and 7, finished 3, 5 and 6, am nearly done 8, and have read a lot of 9.  Enjoyed all of them. 

The Foundation series by Asimov was my first introduction to Sci-Fi, way back in Grade 4, and has been my go to benchmark for good literature ever since.  The Lord of the Rings trilogy and the Hobbit was my introduction to the fantasy genre the year prior, and likewise set the bar 😃

My own recommendations are as follows:

1) Nearly anything by C.S. Friedman (This Alien Shore, The Madness Season, Coldfire Trilogy, and the Magister Trilogy).  She blends science fiction and fantasy in an incredibly well thought out manner, and her in depth research into the topics covered throughout her fiction, both technical and emotional, is extremely evident.  Most of her work exposes the darkness within humanity, and the constant fight to overcome that darkness.  Her anti-heroes seduce you into liking them, understanding them, despite your natural abhorrence for their decisions.  The most intelligent of them recognize that their decisions leading them to the path they are on stem from their own weakness.  The author's ability to make you empathize with both hero and villain, sometimes the same person, is extraordinary.

2) The Culture series by Iain M Banks. If you liked Dan Simmon's Hyperion series, you will almost certainly fall in love with this series. These books do not need to be read in any particular order, though I recommend commencing with Excession or The Hydrogen Sonata to get a feel for the nature of the civilization named The Culture, before venturing into other books in the series in a relatively chronological order. Some of the events in these books occur with thousands of years of separation between them, though given the nature of AI and the existent technological state throughout most of the series there are upon occasion people or characters who show back up after lengthy periods have passed (this is an exception, not the rule).  This is an epic space opera worthy of Hyperion and better, in my opinion, than even The Expanse.  Unfortunately, Iain M Banks has passed away, and will not be expanding this series =(

3) Discworld series by Terry Pratchett.  If you enjoy your whimsical yet on target satire in a fantasy setting, read these.  Some of the most entertaining yet soul-searching material I've ever laid eyes upon.  Sir Terry (knighted for his written work) has also passed away, but his work will live on for centuries.  I also recommend a short sci-fi novel he wrote called The Dark Side of the Sun, which makes a very intelligent observation about life in general, while simultaneously being quite entertaining.

4) I enjoyed The Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind up until the last book or two.  I feel that while this series started out very well, it runs into issues because it does not understand how to manage power curves (unlike The Culture series above, which manages it very well).  By the end it felt a little like Dragonball.

5) I won't mention George RR Martin's better known work, even though I loved it before it became the global phenomenon it is.  Instead, I'll recommend you read his Wildcard series, which he began and then edited (with multiple contributing authors), about superheroes in real life.  Feels a lot like "The Boys" on Amazon Prime Video, or Watchmen.

6) "Soon I will be Invincible" is an even better representation of that genre, by much lesser known author Austin Grossman.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soon_I_Will_Be_Invincible.  Absolutely incredible book, cannot recommend it enough for anyone who enjoys behind the scenes superhero narratives that aren't all "bright and shiny".

7) The Martian (yes, also now a movie) is excellent.  Fortunately, the movie was a good rendition of the novel, but for those purists, I still recommend reading  it or even listening to the audiobook, which was exceptionally performed.

I can probably add a lot of books to this list, depending on which way your fantasy or sci-fi interests bend, but will leave it at that for now 😃

Edited by Angelix

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14 hours ago, Angelix said:

4) I enjoyed The Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind up until the last book or two.  I feel that while this series started out very well, it runs into issues because it does not understand how to manage power curves (unlike The Culture series above, which manages it very well).  By the end it felt a little like Dragonball.

I actually hate this series. I think it stems from my great dislike of the author himself, but even still I don't like his books. I read the first 3 or 4 in an attempt to give it a chance. The author, though...I'd like to punch him in his face.

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Seconding every thing by Terry Pratchett, I was lucky enough to meet the great man himself at a lecture he gave when I was a teen and got a signed map of Ankh Morpok. Met the lady who is now my wife and found she was also a fan and we discussed it at length. 

Im also reading the Swallows and Amazon series to the bump, it's by Arthur Ransom and is a series I read as a kid. So far it stands up, I think the author was very much a man of his time yet very clearly highlights the competence of the female characters. That said Im half way through the first book and hoping not to be disappointed!

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7 hours ago, MadCast: Mandalorian said:

I actually hate this series. I think it stems from my great dislike of the author himself, but even still I don't like his books. I read the first 3 or 4 in an attempt to give it a chance. The author, though...I'd like to punch him in his face.

Don't know anything about the Author, but I can understand your thoughts regarding his literature.  I certainly do not consider them equal to the other works mentioned.  They feel more as if they were written for the "young adult" fiction genre.

I did forget to mention one other series I enjoyed, more for its eclectic non-stop imagery and action than for actual solid plot.  The Quantum Gravity series by Justina Robson.

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7 hours ago, MadCast: Kal said:

Seconding every thing by Terry Pratchett, I was lucky enough to meet the great man himself at a lecture he gave when I was a teen and got a signed map of Ankh Morpok. Met the lady who is now my wife and found she was also a fan and we discussed it at length. 

I definitely regret never having the opportunity to meet him in person.  Awesome that you found someone who shares your excellent taste 😃

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