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MadCast: Wazap

Spanish Words.

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Greetings. 

I'll be using this forum thread to share with everyone some spanish words, and its meaning. I will be updating it daily/weekly depending on my availability/indolence.

If someone has any specific inquiry, or request about a word let me know. 

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Word of the day: Amor/Amar

Amor(noun) means Love, while amar(verb) means "to love"

I love Yo amo
You love Tu amas/Usted ama
He loves El ama
She loves Ella ama
It loves  
We love Nosotros amamos
They love Ellos aman
  Vosotros amais
   

Side note: Spanish has two "you" pronouns, "Usted" is the formal form, while "Tu" is informal. 

Side note 2:  The "it" pronoun does not exist in spanish. Instead it is replaced by "lo", "la", or "es"depending on the word, sentence, and/or context.

Side note 3: The "vosotros" pronoun, also called "voseo" is a different type of pronoun more commonly used in Castilian spanish(From Spain), and it basically means "you all". Its quite the nightmarish pronoun for non-native speakers, so lets stay away from it(no one really uses it anyways). 

Sentence examples:

I love you  - Yo te amo

I love pineapple pizza - Yo amo la pizza de piña

I will love you for the rest of my live - Yo te amare (Future Tense) por el resto de mi vida.

 

That's it for today. If I made any mistake please let me know; my english is not the best. 

 

 

 

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I LOVE this Wazap, but I wonder; is "vosotros" similar to the "vous" pronoun in French? Vous is used as a way to say "you" but is only intended to be used in very formal settings, such as with strangers or superiors, or as a group addressing, such as "you all are here". It's not very commonly used, especially not in Québécois, so I'm curious if there are any similarities.

Edited by MadCast: Kitty Stark

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6 hours ago, MadCast: Kitty Stark said:

I LOVE this Wazap, but I wonder; is "vosotros" similar to the "vous" pronoun in French? Vous is used as a way to say "you" but is only intended to be used in very formal settings, such as with strangers or superiors, or as a group addressing, such as "you all are here". It's not very commonly used, especially not in Québécois, so I'm curious if there are any similarities.

I don't know about french, but in spanish "vos", and "tu" are considered informal. "Usted" is what you would use in a formal settings.

"Vos", and "Tu" are interchangeable, and it depends on the place you are visiting.

8 hours ago, MadCast: VoShay said:

It seems you forgot "Yo amare la pizza de pina por el resto de mi vida."

I'm so ashamed. I can't believe I forgot that magnificent sentence.

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55 minutes ago, MadCast: Wazap said:

it depends on the place you are visiting

Dafuq??? 🤔 I'd love to get a better explanation sometime in Discord

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In honor to @MadCast: The Öutcast.

Word of the day: Pato(noun).

Ducks are aquatic birds - Patos son aves acuaticas

Do you want to buy a duck? - Tu quieres comprar un pato?  (Informal)

                                                   - Usted quisiera comprar un pato? (Formal)

The duck was delicious - El pato estaba delicioso 

 

"Pato" could also be slang for "little bitch", and/or a derogatory term for "homosexual" in some Spanish-speaking countries, so be careful with the context when you use this word. 

Example:

You are such a little bich - Tu si eres pato 

Stop being so gay - Deja de ser tan pato.

Side note: The severity of this term changes depending on context, and/or country, but its better for non-native speakers to avoid it unless 100% comfortable with the language, and the person you are using it on. 

 

 

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Today's word: Danza/Baile(noun), and Bailar/Danzar(verb)

While "Dance" can be used both as a verb, and a noun. Spanish has two different conjugations for it (Baile/Danza. Bailar/Danzar). As per usual the use of "baile", or "danza" will depend mostly on geographical location, and/or context. 

 

I dance Yo bailo - Yo danzo
You dance Tu bailas - Tu danzas - Usted Baila (Formal)
He/She dances El/Ella baila - El /Ella danza
We dance Nosotros bailamos - Nosotros danzamos
  Vosotros bailais - Vosotros danzais 
They dance

Ellos bailan - Ellos danzan

 

In a sentence:

I dance everyday - Yo bailo todos los dias/Yo danzo todos los dias.

He dances when he is happy - El baila cuando esta feliz/El danza cuando esta feliz. 

I love dancing under the stars  - Yo amo bailar bajo las estrellas/ Yo amo danzar bajo las estrellas. 

Last night's dance was beautiful - El baile de anoche fue hermoso/La danza de anoche fue hermosa. 

 

Side note: In most countries/regions baile/bailar is used as the informal version or danza/danzar, while in some others baile/bailar has replaced danza/danzar entirely.

Side note 2: Danzar/Baile - Bailar/Danzar can still be use interchangeably in most scenarios. 

 

 

 

 

 

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